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The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) opened the week at 3184 and closed Friday at 3221, up 16 points on the day and 1.2% for the week. SPX gapped open higher Friday morning and held its gains through the day. Trading volume spiked higher, but this was probably due to the expiration of several index option and futures contracts, viz., this quarter’s quadruple witching.

The strength of the market this week was primarily due to increased optimism concerning our trade negotiations with China. Those reports are very preliminary with few solid details, so that remains a possible source of volatility for the markets.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, opened and closed the week at 12.5%. This isn’t a record low, but it does suggest that the large institutional traders are relatively calm. In the absence of any surprising news, volatility is likely to remain low this week as many traders are on holiday.

IWM, the ETF based on the Russell 2000 group of companies, mimicked SPX’s price action pretty closely this week, opening at 164 and closing up 1.2% at 166. IWM gapped open higher each morning this week. You don’t see that every day.

The bulls didn’t forget the NASDAQ Composite index this week, closing the week at 8925, up 1.5% on the week. NASDAQ displayed a strong gap opening higher Friday morning. Trading volume on NASDAQ came in above the 50 dma every day this week, and then spiked yesterday, primarily as a result of quadruple witching.

This week’s market delivered a strong performance with each of the broad market indices gaining 1.2% to 1.5%. If we take a longer term view of this year’s market, we find three major trading sessions. The first was a strong bullish market from the first of the year until early May.. Then the market traded roughly sideways through early October, and blasted higher for the balance of the year. The price action of IWM this week reinforced the overall bullish nature of this market. The high beta stocks are finally seeing some action as bullish traders begin to take on more risk. Speculation about the China trade negotiations will continue to deliver periods of price volatility. Threats from North Korea may send the markets a surprise as the new year approaches. I am bullish, but I also remain cautious. Keep a close eye on this market and keep your stops tight.

Merry Christmas and best wishes for a prosperous and happy new year.

The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) opened the week at 3142, almost exactly where last week’s trading opened, and managed to finally gain some steam on Thursday, closing Friday at 3169, up almost 1%. The bullish trading pattern was similar to recent weeks, with price volatility driven by the latest news and rumors about the progress of the China trade negotiations. Thursday’s strong run higher on increased trading volume was driven by the announcement of a phase one deal, but then Friday’s market was much more subdued as traders realized that the specific terms of the deal were a bit cloudy. Trading volume for the S&P 500 companies increased this week, strongly breaking the 50-day moving average (dma) on Thursday, but remaining only slightly above average on Friday.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, opened the week at 14.3% and spiked upward to close Monday at 15.9%. VIX then steadily declined the balance of the week, closing Friday at 12.6%. The large institutional traders are relatively calm.

IWM, the ETF based on the Russell 2000 group of companies, mimicked SPX’s price action pretty closely this week and I view this as a bullish sign since markets are typically led by these small to mid-cap stocks.

The NASDAQ Composite index also traded in a similar pattern to the S&P 500, closing the week at 8735, up 1% on the week.

This week’s market was much more steady than last week’s wild ride. Traders are a little cautious about going “all in” based on the vague announcements about the China trade deal. Even when the details of the phase one trade agreement are made public, the market may not trade significantly higher. Much of that positive trade agreement news may be already priced into this market. Any surprises in the trade agreement could result in a sharp pullback.

The price action of IWM this week once again matched SPX toe to toe. IWM has traded much weaker than the broad market blue chips most of this year. But that relationship has been turning positive over the past couple of weeks and that is a bullish sign.

This week was more encouraging, but I still have a significant amount of cash on the sidelines. I won’t be strongly bullish until we settle the trade dispute with China. My best guess is that the phase one trade agreement will be somewhat disappointing when we finally see the details. The phase two agreement may be several  months into next year, if not after the November elections. Therefore, we may be in for more of the price volatility we have been living with for the past three or four weeks, as rumors and speculation about the China trade negotiations hit the market. I remain cautious.

The following stocks traded strongly this week and will be on my watch list for next week: AAPL, AXP, BSX, GOOGL, BMY, MRK, and UNH.

The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) opened the week at 3144 and plunged nearly one percent to close at 3114 on Monday. But the worst was yet to come. Tuesday’s open was again nearly one percent down, but after trading as low as 3070, SPX recovered to close at 3093. Then Wednesday brought a gap opening higher and the Standard and Poors 500 Index closed today at 3146, almost a perfect round trip from Monday’s open. The bulls are in charge, but they are very nervous. Be careful you aren’t trampled in the stampedes.
Just as we have seen in recent weeks, this week’s market schizophrenia was triggered by comments about the trade negotiations with China. An off-handed comment from President Trump while he was in Europe triggered this sell off, but many times it starts with only a rumored comment from an unnamed insider. Trading volume for the S&P 500 companies continues to run below average, only breaking the 50-day moving average (dma) on Tuesday’s scary gap downward.

The volatility index for the S&P 500 options, VIX, opened the week at 12.7% and closed on Monday at 14.9%. But the severe drop on Tuesday pushed the intraday VIX to 18% before settling back and declining the rest of the week, closing today at 13.6%.

IWM, the ETF based on the Russell 2000 group of companies, has traded much more weakly than the S&P 500 companies all year. That correlation shifted this week. IWM matched SPX’s price action almost exactly, breaking support on Tuesday, but then recovering strongly to close today at 163, slightly higher than Monday’s open. This price action is bullish. Bull markets are typically led by these small to mid-cap stocks. Many analysts call these stocks the “risk off” stocks as traders swing for the fences in a strong bull market. I can’t be that bullish as long as the China trade cloud hangs over the market. But it is a bullish indicator.

The NASDAQ Composite index opened the week at 8673, and closed the week at 8657, up 86 points today – almost a round trip from Monday’s open. NASDAQ trading volume has been consistently running above the 50 dma far more often than the S&P 500 index. NASDAQ’s trading volume this week was at or above the 50 dma every day. That is probably driven by the so-called FANG stocks, FB, AMZN, NFLX and GOOGL. I would add AAPL to this list. The large high-tech stocks have been driving this bull market.

This week’s roller coaster ride was a little scary. That gap down in price on the S&P 500 Tuesday morning was alarming. But then we end the week where we started? This week’s trading is the best evidence yet of the nervous nature of this market. The large institutional traders have their fingers poised over the sell buttons (actually they have programmed their computers, but the poised finger delivers a more powerful image).

On the positive side, the price action of IWM was very bullish. IWM matched SPX toe to toe this week and even closed the week higher than it started. IWM has traded much weaker than the broad market blue chips most of this year.

I am putting more of my cash to work, but this week was unnerving. I still have a significant amount of cash on the sidelines. I won’t be strongly bullish until we settle the trade dispute with China. But it is anyone’s guess when that might happen. Be cautious.

I have almost become accustomed to the Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) setting new all-time highs every week. It seemed quite reasonable that the markets would slow a bit this week, but then the S&P 500 index gapped open higher Friday morning and set a new all-time high. Wow.

But before we run off and sell everything we own and buy stocks, it is a bit sobering to pay attention to the trading volume. Friday was the only day this week that trading volume for the S&P 500 companies reached the 50-day moving average (dma). And it just reached it; volume did not break higher. That serves to moderate my bullish enthusiasm.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, closed Friday at 12%. This was the lowest closing level for volatility this year. One must go back to September 21st, 2018 to find a lower close for VIX. Traders are feeling calm and bullish.

IWM consists of the Russell 200 companies, largely small to mid-cap domestic companies with higher beta values. These are the “risk on” stocks. IWM has been trapped in a sideways channel defined on the lower edge by the highs from August and September around 157.50, and on the upper edge by the intraday highs around 160 from the last two weeks. IWM closed Friday at 158.9, up 0.82. A breakout of IWM would be a strong confirmation of the bull market.

Similar to the S&P 500 companies, the NASDAQ Composite index set a new 
all-time high on Tuesday, but traded flat most of this week. NASDAQ gapped open Friday morning and ended the day at a new all-time high of 8541, up 62. NASDAQ trading volume was stronger than the S&P 500 companies, breaking out above the 50 dma three out of five days this week.

We continue to see consistent bullish signals over the past several weeks with new all-time highs on several of the broad market indices, Dow Jones Industrials, S&P 500, and NASDAQ. Moderately weak trading volume and IWM’s sideways trading are the principal cautionary signals.

The strong market surge on Friday came as a result of positive news on the trade negotiations with China. Be careful not to jump too soon or too strongly. We don’t have a signed trade deal as yet. The market is certain to leap higher on the news of a signed deal, but it also bears repeating that even a rumor that a deal is being delayed once again will cause a pullback in the markets.

My trading posture is bullish but I remain cautious. My stops are tighter and I don’t hesitate to close my losers. The price charts for the following stocks are impressive: AAPL, EW, GOOGL, LULU, MSFT, and PANW.

The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) opened the week by setting a new 
all-time high at $3032 and then added 1.2% this week to close Friday at 3067, another all-time high. The choppy trading resulting from the China trade negotiations that has characterized recent weeks was generally absent this week. The bulls are in charge. Unlike recent weeks, trading volume for the S&P 500 companies broke out above the 50-day moving average (dma) four days this week. That has not happened in a long time. Perhaps the bulls have opened up their wallets a bit.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, opened the week slightly above 13% and steadily declined to close the week at 12.3%. Volatility hasn’t been this low since July. The market apparently isn’t too concerned about the China trade negotiations and all of the breathless impeachment talk.

I have always used the Russell 2000 Index (RUT) to track small capitalization stocks and compare those performances to the large blue-chip stocks of the S&P 500. Unfortunately, the Russell company has raised their prices so much that my charting service, StockCharts.com, has given up carrying the Russell 2000 index. A few months ago, the software that I use to analyze and back test option trades quit offering intraday pricing for RUT options due to the rising prices for the data. I am changing over to tracking the price chart of the ETF, IWM, which is based on the Russell 2000 group of companies. IWM is roughly one tenth the price of the Russell index (similar to the relationship of SPX and SPY). IWM closed at 158.10 on Friday, and RUT closed at 1589.33. The minor differences in price are due to the stocks in the Russell 2000 index being weighted by shares outstanding whereas IWM contains shares of the Russell 2000 companies weighted by market capitalization.

IWM broke through the previous highs from September and July, and closed Friday at 158, up 3 points. IWM remains well below its all-time high of 171 in August 2018.

The NASDAQ Composite index gapped open Monday morning at 8286, and proceeded to add another 1.2% to close at 8386, up 94 points on Friday. This represents another all-time high for NASDAQ. NASDAQ trading volume hit the 50 dma on Monday and traded above the average Thursday and Friday.

This week brought us several bullish signals. First of all, we finally are beginning to see some increased trading volume. Money is coming in off the sidelines. An even more bullish signal came from IWM. The Russell 2000 companies, all domestic small cap stocks, outperformed both the S&P 500 and NASDAQ this week, up 1.3%, as compared to 1.2% for SPX and NASDAQ. SPX and NASDAQ set new all-time highs this week and the Dow is one point away from setting a new all-time high. Several of these broad market indices displayed multiple gap openings higher this week – all in all, a very bullish week.

My caution is beginning to diminish a bit and I am putting more of my cash to work. However, I won’t be strongly bullish until we settle the trade dispute with China. Some negative news on that front could hit the market at any time. On the other hand, a signed deal would spike this market higher. Stay alert. Whenever possible, use trailing stops to protect your gains.

The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) closed Friday at 3023, up 12 points. Friday’s close represented a gain for the week of 0.9%. Although it was a bullish trend for the week, it was a choppy path higher as each day brought a new report or rumor about the trade negotiations with China.

Trading volume for the S&P 500 companies only broke above the 50-day moving average (dma) on one day this week, and Friday’s trading came in significantly below average. The lower volume continues to stand as a caution flag for this market. The bulls are buying, but they are also nervous and taking profits when they are available.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, declined significantly Wednesday through Friday, closing the week at 12.7%. Volatility hasn’t been this low since July. The market is calming in spite of all of the China trade and impeachment talk.

The Russell 2000 Index (RUT) continued to track higher this week, closing Friday at 1559, up 1.1% on the week.

The NASDAQ Composite index broke through resistance this week and closed Friday at 8243, up 57 points, capping off a strong week’s performance of 1.3%. Watch for the next resistance level at July’s high of 8330. NASDAQ trading volume was below average all week, but managed to touch the 50 dma on Friday.

It is worth noting that both the Russell 2000 and the NASDAQ Composite outperformed the S&P 500 index this week. That is a strong bullish signal.

This week’s trading was generally bullish, but each day brought a new twist, sometimes higher and sometimes lower. The trade negotiations with China continue to hang over the market. We are fortunate the U.S. economy is strong enough to persevere through these tariffs.

I am continuing to be somewhat cautious in this market. It is certainly a bullish market, but the bulls are nervous and it doesn’t take much to cause them to hit the sell button. I am picking my stocks carefully and favoring the solid blue chips like AAPL, COST and JPM. My iron condor trades on SPX are doing very well, gaining 27% in October and 16% for the November position. Stay alert. Whenever possible, use trailing stops to protect your gains.

News and rumors continue to jerk this market around on a daily basis. The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) closed Friday at 2986, down 12 points. SPX remained modestly positive for the week, up 0.7%. It was a choppy week for the markets with a new report or rumor about the trade negotiations with China driving the market almost on a daily basis. Last Friday’s evening star candlestick was not confirmed by trading this week. The bullish underlying trend remains, but each day brings a new dose of either confidence or pessimism. It is a difficult market to trade. When it moves higher, traders take profits, and then the next rumor drives it lower, and the bulls buy the lows.

Trading volume for the S&P 500 companies broke above the 50-day moving average (dma) on Friday but the first four days of the week traded at volumes well below average. The lower volume continues to stand as a caution flag for this market. The bulls are buying, but they are also taking profits.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, reflected the choppy market action this week, opening the week at 15.7% and then moving to a low on Thursday of 13.8%. But Friday’s market weakness took its toll, increasing volatility to 14.6%. This is a moderate level of volatility, not exactly calm, but not scary either.

The Russell 2000 Index (RUT) appears to be attempting a rebound over the past couple of weeks after a very weak September. Russell closed Friday at 1525, down five points on the day, but up 1.2% for the week.

The NASDAQ Composite index appeared to hit resistance this week at the highs set in May and September. NASDAQ closed Friday at 8090, down 67 points, but up 0.6% for the week. NASDAQ trading volume was below average all week, but managed to touch the 50 dma on Friday.

This week was a repeat of last week’s trading with wide swings one day and then a doji candlestick the next day, driven by the latest rumors and/or news on the trade negotiations with China. This remains a dangerous market. I expect the volatility will continue and I remain less than fully invested. Pick your trades carefully and stop out positions aggressively.

Encouraging news from the China trade negotiations buoyed the market this week. The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) opened Monday at 2944, but declined on Monday and Tuesday to a closing low on Tuesday of 2893. Then the bulls started hearing positive rumors from the China trade negotiations and the market rallied the balance of the week, with SPX closing Friday at 2970, up 2.7% from Tuesday’s close. Don’t get too excited yet. SPX gapped open Friday morning and traded as high as 2993, before fading into the close at 2970. This resulted in the classic “evening star” candlestick on Friday. This was matched in the Nasdaq 100 and the Nasdaq Composite, but less so for the Dow or the Russell 2000 indices. The evening star often signals the top of a bullish trend, predicting a possible bearish reversal. Watch the trading closely next week to confirm this signal. Trading volume in the S&P 500 companies ran below average all week and barely made it up to the 50-day moving average (dma) on Friday. The lower volume continues to stand as a caution flag for this market. The bulls are buying, but they are also taking profits.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, spiked back up to 20.3% on Tuesday’s bearish price action, but traded lower the balance of the week, closing at 15.6% on Friday. This is a borderline level of volatility. Remain circumspect.

The Russell 2000 Index (RUT) tried to match recent lows on Tuesday’s market weakness, but bounced back the rest of the week, closing at 1512 on Friday. Friday’s price action broke out above the 50 dma at 1512 and then touched the 200 dma at 1527 before pulling back to close at the 50 dma. Russell’s bearish trend for the past several months remains a significant cautionary sign for the overall market.

The NASDAQ Composite index mimicked the S&P 500 price action this week, trading much higher after Tuesday’s down day, gapping open Friday morning, trading through the 50 dma, and closing up 106 points at 8057. The cautionary news is that the intraday high was one hundred points higher at 8116. NASDAQ trading volume was below average all week, but managed to break the 50 dma on Friday.

This week was typical of recent market activity with wide swings almost daily, based on the latest rumors and/or news (although it is often difficult to distinguish the two). Tuesday’s trading looked ugly, but then the market stabilized, traded higher Wednesday and Thursday, and then turned in a large gap opening higher Friday morning. All the financial news anchors were euphoric. Recall that they were all repeating “manufacturing recession” ad nauseum last week.

Encouraging reports from the trade negotiations with China helped turn the tide in the market this week, but Friday’s fade late in the day underscores traders’ nervousness. They took profits when given the chance. Don’t let Friday’s price action get you too excited. We may not have seen the worst of this market and I expect the volatility will continue. This week’s optimism was based on reports of positive progress in negotiations with China, but that could easily be overturned by next week’s news.

The trade war with China continues to haunt this market. The result is a sideways market with sudden and unpredictable twitches on the latest trade negotiation news. The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) attempted to match the July highs in mid-September, but turned lower and declined modestly for about ten days before plunging on October 1st and 2nd. SPX declined to 2856 on Thursday before bouncing and recovering over half of the previous day’s losses. SPX gapped open Friday morning, broke through the 50-day moving average (dma) at 2942, and closed up 41 points at 2952. This particular market tantrum appears to have ended, but the storm will continue until we get confirmation of a China trade deal. Trading volume has generally remained below average for the past couple of weeks with a notable exception on Wednesday as we hit the lows for the week. Volume declined Thursday and Friday as the market recovered. The bulls have not given up on this market, but they are clearly nervous, and definitely not “all in”.

VIX, the volatility index for the S&P 500 options, opened the week at 17.2%, spiked to an intraday high of 21.5% on Wednesday, and then declined to close Friday at 17.0%. This remains a moderately high level of volatility that is worthy of caution.

The Russell 2000 Index (RUT) steadily trended lower from its high of 1585 on September 16th to a close of 1480 on Wednesday for a decline of nearly 7%. Russell is by far the most bearish of all of the broad market indices. Thursday’s intraday low at 1462 was close to the lows in August around 1456. RUT closed higher at 1500 on Friday, but remains about 1% below its 50 dma at 1521 and its 200 dma at 1523.

The NASDAQ Composite index lost about 5% in this pullback. NASDAQ bounced on Thursday, finding support at the lows from August and its 200 dma at 7720. NASDAQ closed Friday at 7982, up 110 points, or 1.4%. NASDAQ’s trading volume spiked on Wednesday’s gap opening lower, but ran at or below average the rest of the week.

This was a scary week for the markets. That gap opening lower on Wednesday spooked me, but when the broad indices recovered somewhat near the end of trading on Wednesday, I saw a glimmer of hope. That was confirmed on Thursday with the long lower candlestick shadows on all of the broad market indices. Traders saw those lows as a buying opportunity and that continued into Friday.

The bottom line for this market has not changed. The trade war with China and political squabbling are making traders nervous. The entertainment and scare mongering that masquerade as financial news was revved up on Wednesday as talking heads on the financial networks breathlessly repeated “manufacturing recession” all day. I long for the old days of neutral, but boring, financial anchors.

Nervous institutional traders hit the sell button on the basis of the lamest of rumors and investigate later. But then they quickly jump back on board lest they miss out on the gains.

It pays to be cautious and focus on solid blue-chip stocks. The following stocks remain above their 50 day moving averages and have made solid gains in this week’s otherwise scary market: NEE, EQIX, INVH and TGT.

The trade negotiations with China remain the principal worry for the markets. The political turmoil appears to be a minor irritant at this point. The result is a sideways market with sudden and unpredictable twitches on the latest trade news. The Standard and Poors 500 Index (SPX) closed today at 2962, down 16 points. The candlesticks of the past four days of trading have long lower shadows, suggesting the market is finding support from the 50-day moving average (dma) at 2949 and the May high at 2952. Trading volume continues to reflect the market’s uncertainty, remaining below the 50-day moving average (dma) all week. The volatility index for SPX, VIX, closed at 17.2%, up about 1.2 points today. This is a moderately worrisome level of volatility. Stay attentive and be cautious.

The Russell 2000 Index (RUT) put in its second week of steady declines, closing at 1520 today, down 2.4% this week alone. Today’s price action was particularly worrisome, breaking down through the 50 dma and closing on the 200 dma. The only positive note is that Russell broke through the 200 dma in late afternoon trading, but recovered to close right at the 200 dma. Technical analysts have always regarded a break of the 200 dma on a stock or an index as very bearish.

The NASDAQ Composite index came close to trading as bearishly as Russell, losing 2% of its value this week as it closed today at 7940, down 91 points. NASDAQ flirted with its 50 dma all week, but decisively broke it today, closing a little over 100 points below the 200 dma at 8041. With the exception of Tuesday, NASDAQ’s trading volume ran below average all week.

Chairman Powell’s news conference appears to have finally squashed all of the recession talk. Now the “sky is falling” crowd can better focus on the trade war with China.

Regardless of which index you prefer to follow, this was an ugly week for the markets. The only glimmer of optimism might be derived from the S&P 500 chart as the index repeatedly appeared to find support on the 50 dma. The long lower candlestick shadows the past four days may not be strong bullish signs, but they show significant support. The large institutional traders have not yet thrown in the towel.

The bottom line for this market has not changed in my opinion. Traders are nervous and exit the market in volume on the least provocation. It pays to be cautious and focus on solid blue-chip stocks. I found it interesting today to see a few stocks defy the overall market and post gains: HAS, RH, FSS, AME and ROST.